Israeli, French Politicians Endorse Blockchain for Governance Transparency

Israeli and French political figures are tapping into the potential of blockchain to ensure more transparent and accountable governance.

Blockchain is moving into the world's political systems, with several influential political figures in Israel and France recently emerging as new believers in the technology. They are betting on blockchain for more transparent governance and have joined the decentralized platform developed by Coalichain.

Among the seven Israeli politicians to endorse the platform are former deputy minister and interior minister Eli Yishay, deputy defense minister Eli Ben-Dan, and HaBait HaYehudi leader Shulamit Mualem-Refaeli. The move for a more accountable democracy has also been supported by Frederic Lefebvre, the founder of French political party Agir.

Levi Samama, co-founder and CEO of Coalichain, said that support for the platform was “a positive indication that politicians are actively seeking ways to be transparent and direct in the way they communicate with the public. In order to impact existing governance mechanisms we need the support and engagement of politicians and citizens alike.”

Blockchain moving into politics

Acceptance of blockchain is gaining traction in the world of politics.

During last month’s presidential election in Russia, blockchain was used by state-run public opinion research center VTSIOM to track exit polls.

In the US, budding political group Indie Party wants to redefine the country’s political environment by providing an alternative to the established two-party system with a political marketplace that uses blockchain and cryptocurrency.

Indie Party founder Jonathan Jenkins commented as follows:

"Our goal is to build a movement that can elect candidates who will create a powerful minority between the two major political parties. At the crux of our movement is the creation of a political marketplace powered by the Indie Token, a new cryptocurrency that engages voters, volunteers, and donors, and supports Indie candidates who are trying to bust up the two-party duopoly by winning elections.”