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Etherparty, a startup with the aim of making smart contracts easier to develop, has joined forces with Singaporean exchange Global DCX, in a partnership that will be mutually beneficial to their platforms.

"We are excited to be partnering on technology with DCX who are strategically positioned in the rising markets in India and Asia, which are perfectly suited for the adoption of blockchain technology and the power of decentralizing technology," said Etherparty CEO, Kevin Hobbs, in a press release published on PR NewsWire.

Global DCX is poised to be a global digital currency exchange, providing services with Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Bitcoin Cash, Monero, Litecoin, and a few fiat “hard” currency pairs. 

The partnership will now allow it to exchange FUEL tokens—Etherparty’s Ethereum-based proprietary token—which will also give Etherparty the backbone it needs to power its smart contract wizard.

Only a few weeks ago, Etherparty also partnered with Jaxx, the startup behind the world’s first mobile wallet for Ethereum, even after users reportedly lost a total of more than $400,000 on the platform due to a vulnerability that hackers exploited.

The vulnerability allowed hackers access to the same network your computer or mobile device is on, and they could sniff out the mnemonic key that authenticates you to your wallet. By stealing this key, someone could open the victim’s wallet on another device and transfer the funds wherever they choose.

Despite the breach, Etherparty saw a partnership with Jaxx beneficial because this would mean gaining exposure to mobile Ethereum wallets, where users will be able to use a tool within their application to transfer FUEL tokens.

In the future, we can expect wizards like Etherparty to take center stage for smart contract creation, empowering small organizations that do not have the manpower or resources to hire their own consultants and developers. As it stands right now, less savvy individuals are disadvantaged when it comes to working with the complexities of creating such contracts. 

With the help of applications that automatically generate the necessary code, even private individuals will be able to enter agreements with one another without needing to know a great deal about the more technical mechanisms behind the scenes.