Carrefour Gets Friendly with Blockchain to Keep Customers Informed

Carrefour, one of Europe's largest retailers, is putting blockchain technology to use in its French operations, helping customers stay informed about the source of the food they purchase.

The food information revolution is here, and blockchain technology is the catalyst behind it, making it possible for shoppers in supermarkets to learn more about the products they purchase.

Carrefour, one of Europe’s largest retailers, has hopped on the blockchain train, announcing the implementation of this technology to provide more transparency about its supply chain.



The company said last week its blockchain solution would help grocery shoppers in France track the journey of their food, starting with chicken.

At their end, customers will be able to scan a product using their smartphones and find information such as where the chickens were raised, their diet, and the place the meat was handled.

By the end of this year, Carrefour will also include this feature for products like honey, cheese, and some vegetables.

This implementation of blockchain technology appears to be part of the plan by CEO Alexandre Bompard to increase sales, especially in organic food.

Carrefour perceives high demand, at least as far as France is concerned, for what its customers see as healthier food choices. Establishing a blockchain-powered tracking feature for its smartphone application should help improve sales from that customer base.

In the meantime, we see Walmart doing something similar in China.

The US retail giant has partnered with IBM to provide a feature that allows customers to track the source of the food items they find on store shelves.

This ambitious project could yield better sales from the more health-conscious customers, who tend to browse for produce more carefully and want to know more about their products than what the labels can provide.

Frank Yiannas, Walmart’s vice-president for food safety, said that such an implementation would provide “new levels of transparency,” which would in turn “result in safer food.”